Design Awards

2021 Award Winners

Congratulations to the winners of the 2021 AIA Baltimore and BAF Excellence in Design Awards.

The program recognizes excellence in architectural design by AIA Baltimore members and AIA members with projects in AIA Baltimore’s region, and contributions to architecture and its understanding in Baltimore through the BAF Golden Griffin and Roger D. Redden Awards.

Built and unbuilt projects submitted by AIA members were judged by a distinguished jury of AIA architects, this year based in Denver, Colorado.

View the 2021 Winners Publication

See the 2021 Design Awards Press Release

Grand Design Award Winner

Morgan State Tina & Calvin Tyler Hall
GWWO Architects

Morgan State University (MSU) is one of the nation’s premier historically black institutions of higher education and the largest in Maryland. The goal for this new student services center was to bridge the historic neoclassical style academic quad and the modern campus commons, while establishing an iconic and uplifting university ‘front door’. 

Tyler Hall improves the student experience by establishing a welcoming entry point for current and prospective students and by gathering the university’s formerly dispersed student services and administrative functions. As a student’s first official point of contact, and their administrative interface, the building was designed to affirm MSU’s long- standing position as a preeminent public university.

The new building has an expressive form, with sweeping curved walls that reach out to embrace its surroundings and invite students into the dynamic campus, while its stone cladding links it to history and tradition. Topographically, the academic quad and the campus commons sit a story above the surrounding neighborhood. To negotiate the grade separation, there are two connected main entrances: one at street-level and the other at the campus commons. A large, landscaped arrival court invites students and visitors toward the street-level entrance where grand stairs, both interior and exterior, mark a formal procession up to the campus commons level.

Inside, the building features reception areas and service desks organized along a series of flowing, multi- story lounges with seating, study, and collaboration spaces. A monumental stair with gently curved landings and a continuous wood soffit forms the connective tissue between the three levels of public lobbies and lounges, anchored by a student services counter. A landscaped terrace on the third floor affords panoramic views of the academic quad, centered on historic Holmes Hall. The iconic new building embodies the university’s pride in its history, and optimism for the future.

Owner: Morgan State University | Architectural Design Team: GWWO Architects | Alan Reed, FAIA, LEED AP; Stephen Teeple, OAA, FRAIC; Tomer Diamant, OAA; Eric Feiss, AIA, LEED AP; Bob Mock, AIA; Jason Hearn, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; David Ritter | Design Architect: Teeple Architects | General Contractor: Barton Malow | Landscape Architect: Floura Teeter | Civil Engineer: Carroll Engineering | Structural Engineer: ReStl Designers, Inc. | Mechanical Engineer: Mueller Associates | Electrical Engineer: WFT Engineering | Photography: Nic Lehoux

AIA Baltimore/Neighborhood Design Center Social Equity Award

E21 Boone
DDB Workshop

 

 

The Social Equity Award, now in its fourth year, recognizes community-driven projects that promote social equity. The award is presented jointly by AIA Baltimore and the Neighborhood Design Center.

E21 Boone is exactly the kind of project that Baltimore needs. By coming into the community and having thoughtful meetings with neighborhood leaders, residents, and partner organizations, the developers were able to build rapport and trust among the community before even breaking ground on the project. Understanding that financing such a project was a cause for developers in the past to not invest, this developer, backed by the support of neighborhood leaders self-financed the project, and were able to bridge the chasm of financing that has held this neighborhood back. Just by their startling contrast and undeniable quality, these new construction row homes were not only able to entice market rate buyers, but command appropriate appraisals, also having the effect of raising appraisals nearby. This had the impact of making feasible renovations of nearby row homes that previously wouldn’t have been able to secure financing. Not only was this of benefit to rehab developers, but those also who had been living in the neighborhood were now able to secure financing to undertake repairs to their own homes as their equity rose.

The project could have stopped there however because of the early conversations with neighbors and community partner organizations, a former community garden that sat just north behind the alley of the development was another project the neighborhood leaders mentioned as a potential challenge. The developers sought input through community meetings held at the elementary school and in a creative place-making process, designed with the leadership of residents to build a public green space in partnership with the community association. This green space added relief to the built environment.

In addition to the green space and cascade of redevelopment, the injection of new neighbors has facilitated a revitalization of a strong sense of community spirit and civic engagement as new residents have joined the existing community association and contributed to efforts to create greater outreach within Midway, fostering a sense of identity within the neighborhood itself.

Owner: DDB Workshop and Maryland Custom Builders | Architectural Design Team: DDB Workshop LLC | Tamir Ezzat | General Contractor: Maryland Custom Builders Inc. / Mautaz Ezzat and Tamir Ezzat | Landscape Architect: DDB Workshop LLC | Civil Engineer: Kimley Horn / Nick Leffner | Structural: DDB Workshop LLC | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: DDB Workshop LLC | Photography: Kasey Ezzat

2021 Award for Excellence in Sustainable and Resilient Design

Jean Packard Occoquan
GWWO Architects

 

Sited on a bluff overlooking the Occoquan River, the Jean R. Packard Occoquan Center is designed to serve many functions: as a wedding venue where couples can begin their life journey; a space children, teens, adults, and corporations can gather for special events and celebrations; and a location where visitors can gain a deeper understanding of both the history and unique environment of the site.

Upon entrance to the Park, visitors will leave the fast-paced world behind and a generous arrival court will allow guests to be dropped off at the building’s soaring glass entrance, giving way to the view of the river and the vegetation beyond. Making their way around the site, guests will get a fuller view of the facility, seeing the building’s two primary material components—glass and timber—coming together as one, a poetic symbol of the event they may be there to witness. With a focus on story-based design, the concept for the Occoquan Center reflects its unique physical setting and history, intertwining the design of the facility with the park’s existing palette.

Driven by the contrast between, and union of, two halves—one light and delicate (public/events) and the other strong and solid (support)—the architectural expression of the Occoquan Center is articulated through the use of different structural systems and materials: delicate steel and glass on the west side allowing for expansive views of the river, and heavy timber and wood cladding on the east.

Similar patterning between the halves ties them together to create a cohesive structure and references the historic structures on site. It has been designed to embody and represent the spirit of the park, while providing effective, efficient facilities that will meet every user’s need. The result is a wedding and celebration destination that will leave a lasting impression on every guest that crosses its threshold.

A prominent feature of the building is ‘The River View at Occoquan,’ an elegant wedding and special events venue with sweeping views of the Occoquan River, including a terrace and garden area. Located adjacent to ‘The River View’ is the ‘1608 Room’ lobby with interpretive education displays about the history of the park and site. The lower level primarily serves park-related functions and contains the riverfront ‘Brickmaker’s Café’ with indoor and outdoor seating opening directly onto the lower terrace, a waterfront plaza and boardwalk, park offices, and various associated amenities. Other project features include a private hospitality suite in a renovated historic building, ‘The Pavilion’ for large outdoor events, and a 5k trail loop around the site.

Ultimately achieving LEED Gold certification, sustainable design features incorporated into the building include daylighting, photo- voltaic roof panels, low-flow plumbing fixtures, recycled and regional content materials with low VOC content, high-efficiency mechanical units and light fixtures, an intensive vegetated roof on the lower level, a parking lot that incorporates pervious concrete paving, and bio-retention ponds to treat on- site stormwater.

Owner: Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority | Architectural Design Team: GWWO Architects | Alan Reed, FAIA, LEED AP; Lisa Andrews, AIA, LEED AP BD+C; Judson Hornfeck | General Contractor: Forrester Construction Company | Landscape Architect: Rhodeside & Harwell, Inc. | Civil Engineer: Burgess & Niple, Inc. | Structural Engineer: Faisant Associates, Inc. | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams, LLC | Photography: Sam Kittner

Michael F. Trostel, FAIA, Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation

Beth Am Synagogue
Alexander Design Studio

 

The historic Beth Am Synagogue in Baltimore, wanted to re-imagine their existing space to better reflect the needs of the congregation and it’s flourishing educational programs. A new addition was carefully added to be in harmony with the existing architecture and improve space functionality. A chapel once buried in a lower level has been moved and expanded in the new addition along street level. It is now a light filled spiritual space adjacent to the beloved main sanctuary. The existing lower level was reconfigured to improve space functionality. An accessible entrance was added along Chauncey and a grand stair connects the reconfigured lower level to the historic sanctuary above.

Owner: Beth Am Synagogue | Architectural Design Team: Alexander Design Studio | Charles Alexander; Jessica Damseaux; Patricia Hollis | General Contractor: Southway Builders, Inc | Landscape Architect: Red Sketch | Civil Engineer: Colbert Matz Rosenfelt, Inc. | Structural: ONYX | Mechanical and Electricall Engineer: Henry Adams Consulting Engineers | Photography: Karl Connolly | Consultants: Acoustic Design Collaborative

Exceptional Detail Award

Alfond Commons
Ayers Saint Gross

 

Alfond Commons, a mixed-use, higher education facility, is the flagship component of Colby College’s revitalization investment in downtown Waterville, Maine. The first major project to be completed on Waterville’s Main Street since the 1960s, the building houses 200 students and resident faculty, all of whom agree to serve the Waterville community as a condition of residency. Infilling a parking lot that long disrupted the urban street edge, Alfond Commons completes the downtown cityscape. The building echoes the materiality of Colby’s main campus and complements the local character of Main Street, weaving it into the existing city fabric. Ground level spaces devoted to recreation, wellness, retail, and a signature community forum activate the street, while a live-learn community on the upper levels includes academic space and social lounges.

The Alfond Commons initiative demonstrates how institutions of higher learning can make significant impacts to the urban realm while simultaneously strengthening the social and economic fabric of their community.

Owner: Colby College | Architectural Design Team: Ayers Saint Gross | Noah Harburger, Michelle Kollmann, Nathan Korkki, Cooper Melton, Michelle Moseley, Eric Moss, Kurtis Pung, Kyle Ritchie, Christopher Sellars, Susan Sullivan, Allison Wilson, Eric Zahn | General Contractor: Landry / French Construction | Landscape Architect: Ayers Saint Gross | Civil and Structural Engineering: Ayers Saint Gross | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Integral Group, LLC
Photography: Trent Bell

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Winner

Cross Street Market
BCT Design Group

Cross Street Market in Federal Hill has been a popular neighborhood hangout within a historic Public Market for years; however, it was in desperate need of redevelopment. Baltimore Development Corporation selected a team led by Caves Valley Partners, Cana Development, Mackenzie Construction, and BCT Design Group to form a Public Private Partnership and bring more vibrancy and diversity of offerings to the market. An important part of the transformation was Phase Two, with the addition of a quality restaurant anchor complete with an activated rooftop. Atlas Restaurant Group envisioned Watershed, a Classic Maryland Seafood House, and engaged BCT to design the restaurant inside and out, and manage the engineering of the new structure.

The overriding concept for the redevelopment of the 30,000 square foot market was to provide a great fresh and prepared food venue for the neighborhood, give existing vendors a chance to continue their business and upgrade their offering, and create an engaging community Living Room that is more permeable, accessible, and complete with outdoor space.

The exterior branding of the building, the refurbishment of its original exterior materials (including concrete block), mid century inspired signage, and new openings (previously blocked up) create a very welcoming gesture to the neighborhood. A few parking spaces along Cross Street were removed to create outdoor sidewalk and seating.

Painted interior and exterior art and signage keep the old tradition of typography and hand-painted advertisements alive. Returning the market to its mid- century aesthetic creates a much greater sense of authenticity.

All of these architectural enhancements, including the rooftop, make the market very accessible and create a sense of place.

Owner: Caves Valley Partners | Architectural Design Team: BCT Design Group | Bryce Turner – Principal, Chris Holler – Project Manager, Paul Evenson – Project Designer, Brian Hearn – Project Architect | General Contractor: Mackenzie Contracting | Landscape Architect: BCT Design Group | Civil Engineer: Kimley-Horn | Structural Engineer: Skarda & Associates | Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: E&S Construction Engineers | Stern & Associates Photography: BCT Design Group, Atlas Restaurant Group, Cana Dev

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Winner

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
Hord Coplan Macht

The design team was challenged to change the function of the building by opening it up, literally and figuratively. Johns Hopkins has been a fixture in the physical landscape of East Baltimore since the original building was completed in 1886. To create a deeper feeling of connection between the school and the city, plans for the façade of the building included removing the existing heavy, dark precast panels and replacing them with a new transparent glass façade, integrating the renovated existing building seamlessly with the new addition. The building’s new transparent façade literally and figuratively invites the community into the school and gives the school a view out to the community.

The building was designed for a significantly smaller student population and at a time when the school offered undergraduate education. The project involves razing of the smaller, residential- scale buildings and the construction of a transformative $36 million, 40,000 sf addition and 26,000 sf renovation on the north end of the building. The goal of the project is to reinvigorate the existing building through innovative space planning to maximize space utilization, improve learning and research, accommodate expanded central student services, minimize long term operating and maintenance expenses and increase overall efficiency within the school.

Through collaborative stakeholder engagement involving visioning and goal- setting exercises, staff interviews, student intercept activities, and 3d model play, the design team identified the following goals for the planning and design of the expanded School of Nursing:

The design team supported school leadership’s desire to create a space that promoted health and

wellness for faculty, students, and visitors, in particular mental and cardiovascular health. To promote mental health, the team created a holistic design focused on employing biophilic design strategies that are open and connected to the outdoors and utilizes patterns from nature.

Owner: Johns Hopkins University | Architectural Design Team: Hord Coplan Macht | Paul Lund, Scott M Walters, Jeff Kreshtool, Esther Furman, Chris Peterson, Leah Wettstein, Laura Lumadue, Hilary Zoretic, Sam Laskey, Cliff Galey | Architect of Record: Hord Coplan Macht. Co-Design Architect: William Rawn Associates and Hord Coplan Macht | General Contractor: Gilbane Construction | Landscape Architect: Hord Coplan Macht | Civil Engineer: RK&K Civil Engineering | Structural Engineer: Hope Furrer Associates | Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: James Posey Associates | Photography: Robert Benson Photography

 

2021 Excellence in Design Award Winner

Josiah Henson Museum  & Park
Ziger|Snead Architects

The Josiah Henson Museum and Park is home to a portion of an original plantation where Reverend Josiah Henson lived and worked as a slave from 1795 to 1830. Henson’s 1849 autobiography is said to have inspired Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

The project transforms the former plantation site to tell the story of Henson’s life, with a new visitor center and the only remaining historic structure rehabilitated as an interpretive exhibit. This museum plays an important role in educating the public of the unfolded story of enslavement and escape through an immersive and emotional journey to the past.

New Visitor Center is the starting point for the visitor experience with a media-rich orientation, spoken from Henson’s point of view. The historic structure, the Riley/Bolten House with attached log kitchen, is preserved and restored to serve as an exhibit, representing the experiences of the past.

While the scale of the new building remains responsive to that of the historic house and the broader suburban context, the deliberate material choices produce a counterpart to the painted plantation house, challenging present day audiences with a symbolic dialogue to face the past and engage in building a path forward.

Owner: Montgomery Parks, Maryland-National Capital Parks & Planning Commission | Architectural Design Team: Ziger|Snead Architects | Steve Ziger, FAIA; Will Rhode, AIA; Miharu Morimoto, AIA; Darragh Brady, AIA; Conor Brady; Travis Akiwowo; Katie Zaeh; Christopher Brown, AIA | General Contractor: CFI Construction Corp. | Landscape Architect: Floura Teeter Landscape Architects | Civil Engineer: A. Morton Thomas | Structural Engineer: Simpson, Gumpertz & Heger | Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Mueller Associates | Photography: Karl Connolly

2021 Honorable Mentions

L on Liberty
FILLAT+ Architecture

L on Liberty is a 71-unit, LEED Gold, affordable housing apartment building located in the north eastern corner of Downtown Baltimore’s West Side Commercial District. The district was once a thriving commercial center which has been in decline for more than a generation.

Located at the corner of North Liberty Street and Clay Street, the structure occupies the entire city block terminating at Park Avenue along its western edge. The existing site was a dilapidated surface parking lot with remnants of the former buildings left as ruins along the southern edge. The building’s form is derived from a combination of a modernist superblock prototype and the traditional Baltimore townhouse fabric. The multifamily building’s ground level units have individual unit entrances creating a neighborhood feel to the redevelopment. A pedestrian right of way was created linking a series of smaller courtyards, thus separating the new building from the existing buildings along the southern edge and preserving the ruins.

The entry lobby is designed as an open inviting space encouraging community gatherings and work study. The building also has a roof terrace overlooking the city skyline while being surrounded by a living roof. The building contains 1BR, 2BR and 3BR units with no onsite vehicular parking. L on Liberty is located along the City’s main north/south bike trail and provides for 25 bicycle parking racks indoors. The project is designed to incorporate sustainable design principles and will be certified LEED Gold.

Owner: N/A | Architectural Design Team: FILLAT+ Architecture | Peter Fillat- President and Lead Architect, Kevin Roycroft- Principal and Lead Architect, Sergio Martinez- Principal and Lead Architect, Austen Hesler- Associate Architect | General Contractor: Hamel Builders, Inc. | Landscape Architect: FILLAT+ Architecture | Civil Engineer: Structural Engineer: Century Engineering | Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Century Engineering | Photography: Sam Oberter Photography

2021 Honorable Mentions

Toki Tako
PI.KL Studio

Situated in the newly revived, mixed-use complex, The Rotunda, and located in the Hampden neighborhood of Baltimore, Toki Tako is a 1,300 sf restaurant fit-out that seeks to bring a contemporary mix to the historic landmark.

Inspired by Korean streetwear culture, this project aims to provide an urban, contemporary space that matches the remix nature of the food being served; a mash-up of authentic Korean meals served in a street food fashion with tacos and ssam.

Though a tightly knit front-of-house, the space utilizes a ‘graphic override’ that visually splits the restaurant along an edge with a burst of pink overtones and varying material undertones. From custom wood and concrete furniture to light fixtures to dyed concrete, the project takes advantage of turning small moments into big events similar to the impact of the flavor profiles offered by the food.

Owner: Toki Tako, Inc | Architectural Design Team: PI.KL Studio | BRIAN BAKSA, KUO PAO LIAN, PAVLINA ILIEVA | General Contractor: J C Porter Construction| Landscape Architect: PI.KL Studio | Civil Engineer: Structural Engineer: PI.KL Studio | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Thomas Foulkes, LLC | Photography: Jennifer Hughes

2021 Honorable Mentions

North Dorchester High School
Hord Coplan Macht

The replacement of North Dorchester High School offers a tremendous opportunity for Dorchester County to advance learning and teaching to a new level. Following a feasibility study that recommended the replacement of the school, the design team partnered with the County to develop the Educational Specifications for the new facility. The community and County leadership helped define planning principles and other key drivers, which helped to influence the design of the new 117,150 sf school.

The challenge to the design team was twofold: create a hub for community amenities and public events, and provide an infrastructure for educational excellence that resonates with the community.

Architecturally, the high school must serve as a Town Hall and embrace the Genius Loci.

The new predominantly two- story school is located on the northeast corner of the site. By doing this, the full site – high school and adjacent middle school –function as one large community asset. The two school buildings bracket a new and improved community athletic and recreation complex, complete with new or improved fields and track facility. This also allowed the project to be built without the loss of any major site functions during construction.

The new building is configured in a modified “H” plan with 2 wings each oriented with the long facades facing to the north and south. This allows rooms to receive the optimal north/ south, supporting energy efficiency. The two wings are connected by a 2- story section of the building.

The southern portion contains the dining commons/ food service, athletics, and auditorium, all organized around a central gathering space that will serve as pre-function space for these large public use spaces. During the day it will also provide general circulation, additional student dining space. It will also provide formal and informal learning spaces, highlighted by a learning stair.

The northern two- story wing contains academic classrooms organized in an “academy” layout with similar subject areas grouped together. English, History/Social Studies and Foreign Languages are grouped together to form a Humanities Academy on the first floor. Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math disciplines are grouped together on the second floor to form a STEAM Academy.

The two wings are connected by a two- story section of the building that contains administration, health clinic, nurse’s suite, and guidance on the ground floor and learning commons, technology education, and art on the second floor.

Owner: Dorchester County Public Schools | Architectural Design Team: Hord Coplan Macht | Peter Winebrenner, Jeff Hagan, Sara Rineer, Adam McDonald, Chris Peterson, Leah Wettstein, Laura Lumadue, Scott Walters | General Contractor: The Whiting Turner Contracting Company
Landscape Architect: Hord Coplan Macht | Civil Engineer: DMS and Associates | Structural Engineer: Morabito Consultants, Inc. | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Gipe Associates, Inc. | Photography: Patrick Ross

2021 Honorable Mentions

Whitehall Mill
Alexander Design Studio

Whitehall Mill is a mixed-use adaptive reuse of a historic mill complex. Originally constructed in 1798 as a flour mill and later converted to a cotton mill, the Hampden development now houses 88,000 sf of re-imagined space including; apartments, a restaurant, vibrant market, public event space, offices and enclosed parking. Over the last two centuries, Whitehall has seen a variety of businesses, periods of vacancy and development struggles due to flood risk. Now, through innovative design and development, Whitehall is an anchor for its community – a home, a gathering place and a cultivation ground for local entrepreneurs.

Owner: Terra Nova Ventures, LLC | Architectural Design Team: Alexander Design Studio | Charles Alexander, AIA, LEED AP; Jessica Damseaux, AIA, LEED AP; Pat rycja Hollis; Phyllis Cook | General Contractor: Whiting Turner | Landscape Architect: Alexander Design Studio | Civil Engineer: Gower Thompson, Inc | Structural Engineer: Mincin Patel Milano (Core and Shell) | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: Henry Adams Consulting Engineers | Photography: Karl Connolly; Andrew Nagl; Stacy Zarin Goldberg; Stephen Davis Consultants: Hencken and Gaines | ONYX |Bob Tucker Consulting | Kate Giese | Ashton Design | Betty Bird | EVI Singer

Good Design=Good Business

Cahill Fitness Center
GWWO Architects

Design of the new Cahill Fitness & Wellness Center, which is located in Baltimore’s Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park, was inspired by the surrounding densely wooded 1,000-acre urban oasis. The building’s natural forms and exterior material palette of wood and glass curtain wall merge the facility with the forested landscape. Inside, wood— specifically, poplar, walnut, and ash—saved by Baltimore’s Camp Small Zero Waste Initiative and milled into construction timber adorns the walls. Carefully planned views out from nearly every space in the building, along with areas for outdoor activities, provide city residents endless opportunities to engage with nature.

The new building replaces a dreary and unwelcoming 1970s recreation center that lacked modern amenities yet remained a beloved community resource. The local community and Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park stakeholder groups were engaged partners throughout the early design stages and were critical in guiding the programmed spaces, notably including the only performance theater within a city rec center. Home to a thriving youth-based theater program, the previous facility lacked space for these young, talented performers, thus restricting the program’s growth. Understanding the community’s needs, the design team worked closely with Baltimore City Recreation and Parks (BCRP) to develop a highly efficient floor plan to ensure parity among other BCRP facilities by allocating fitness space within the central core to allow for the additional performance space.

Additionally, the 30,000-SF facility houses a gymnasium, natatorium, fitness area, dance studio, and classroom. Interior spaces are flexible and durable, able to accommodate a range of intergenerational programming. New site features include a splash area adjacent to the natatorium, playground, basketball courts, and picnic area.

Designed to be compliant with the International Green Construction Code (IgCC), the building’s sustainable design elements include light colored roofing materials to minimize heat island effect, water-efficient plumbing fixtures, recycled materials, and low-emitting materials. Energy reduction initiatives include LED energy efficient lighting throughout the building, natural daylighting coupled with fritted glazing and sun shading devices on the exterior to control the amount of direct sunlight entering the building, and energy efficient HVAC systems.

Owner: Baltimore City Recreation and Parks | Architectural Design Team: GWWO Architects | Alan Reed, FAIA, LEED AP; John Gregg, AIA, VMA, LEED AP; Monica Pascatore, AIA, LEED AP; Brian Eschman, AIA; Eric Baumgartner, AIA; Pat rick Fava; Danielle Peters, AIA; Lacey Anthony | General Contractor: Dustin Construction | Landscape Architect: Mahan Rykiel Associates, Inc. | Civil Engineer: MK Consulting Engineers | Structural: Faisant Associates | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: MIN Engineering | Photography: Tom Holdsworth

Good Design=Good Business Honorable Mention

Center for Community Engagement
Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects

This project involved the repair and restoration of a vacant 20,000 square foot historic building in downtown York, PA which had functioned as “The Lafayette Club” – a prominent private businesspersons’ club for nearly 100 years until the club ceased operations in 2012. The unoccupied structure was not maintained – and roof leaks led to interior plaster ceiling/wall damage and deterioration of room finishes, millwork and unique character defining features.

In addition to the extensive physical repairs required, the layout of existing rooms and types of spaces within the building was eclectic including two first floor parlor-type rooms with high ceilings, tall windows, and ornate fireplaces all dating from the original 1839 Federal style townhouse construction. Later additions provided more dining/meeting rooms including a first floor “tavern” space with painted wall murals based on historic etchings depicting 18th Century life in York City.

Fortuitously, York College of Pennsylvania was persuaded to purchase the historic but rapidly deteriorating building and undertake the significant repairs, MEP system replacements, life safety/code upgrades and other required improvements. All roof, exterior brick masonry, wood cornice/fasciae and window components were repaired in accordance with the Secretary of Interior’s standards. All interior plaster wall/ceiling surfaces, multi- component wood base, floors, window, and door trim were similarly repaired or replicated in- kind.

The building design “worked with” (not against) the historic building – to accommodate three programs for the College’s new “downtown” location: The Center for Community Engagement; Hospitality Management; and Glatfelter Scholars. This prominent building no longer embodies “exclusion” based on gender, race, or religion – and now represents community “diversity” and “inclusiveness” via the facility programming, usage, and strong commitment to “social equity.”

To meet the requirement that all (five) interior floor levels be accessible, a new 2500 lb. capacity elevator was inserted at an inside corner between the original residence and a later addition. The hoistway is clad in an offset pattern of zinc panels which are also exposed inside the new entry lobby along with a “discovered” steel column. To obtain full accessibility, the existing one- story brick Duke Street entrance including doors and leaded glass sidelight/transom assembly was carefully disassembled and re-erected six feet farther east under the existing roof canopy.

Within the first floor hall, two existing “interior phone booths” were restored – along with wood coat rack standards repurposed into a display about the building’s history. The monumental “tiger maple” staircase was meticulously restored. The iconic Tavern Room murals were repaired by a paint conservation artist – along with restoration of the dark wood wall paneling, period grass cloth inserts and Moravian tile fireplace surrounds in adjacent first floor rooms.

This prominent building no longer embodies “exclusion” based on gender, race, or religion – and now represents community “diversity” and “inclusiveness” and a strong commitment to “social equity”. The completed restoration/conservation/renovation effort preserves and re-energizes a historic City landmark – and has been a huge success for the college – certainly exemplifying that “Good Design = Good Business.”

Owner: York College of Pennsylvania | Architectural Design Team: Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects | Frank E. Dittenhafer II, FAIA, LEED AP; Peter Schwab, AIA, LEED AP; Lauren Myatt, AIA, LEED AP; Ryan J. Shank, AIA; Lisa H.B. Clemens, Kyle Giumento, Associate AIA | General Contractor: Kinsley Construction | Landscape Architect: Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects | Civil Engineer: Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects | Structural Engineer: Baker, Ingram & Associates | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: JDB Engineering, Inc. | Photography: Mike Mihalo Photography

Good Design=Good Business Honorable Mention

E21 Boone
DDB Workshop

E21 Boone is exactly the kind of project that Baltimore needs. By coming into the community and having thoughtful meetings with neighborhood leaders, residents, and partner organizations, the developers were able to build rapport and trust among the community before even breaking ground on the project. Understanding that financing such a project was a cause for developers in the past to not invest, this developer, backed by the support of neighborhood leaders self-financed the project, and were able to bridge the chasm of financing that has held this neighborhood back. Just by their startling contrast and undeniable quality, these new construction row homes were not only able to entice market rate buyers, but command appropriate appraisals, also having the effect of raising appraisals nearby. This had the impact of making feasible renovations of nearby row homes that previously wouldn’t have been able to secure financing. Not only was this of benefit to rehab developers, but those also who had been living in the neighborhood were now able to secure financing to undertake repairs to their own homes as their equity rose.

The project could have stopped there however because of the early conversations with neighbors and community partner organizations, a former community garden that sat just north behind the alley of the development was another project the neighborhood leaders mentioned as a potential challenge. The developers sought input through community meetings held at the elementary school and in a creative place-making process, designed with the leadership of residents to build a public green space in partnership with the community association. This green space added relief to the built environment.

In addition to the green space and cascade of redevelopment, the injection of new neighbors has facilitated a revitalization of a strong sense of community spirit and civic engagement as new residents have joined the existing community association and contributed to efforts to create greater outreach within Midway, fostering a sense of identity within the neighborhood itself.

Owner: DDB Workshop and Maryland Custom Builders | Architectural Design Team: DDB Workshop LLC | Tamir Ezzat | General Contractor: Maryland Custom Builders Inc. / Mautaz Ezzat and Tamir Ezzat | Landscape Architect: DDB Workshop LLC | Civil Engineer: Kimley Horn / Nick Leffner | Structural: DDB Workshop LLC | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: DDB Workshop LLC | Photography: Kasey Ezzat

Good Design=Good Business Honorable Mention

L on Liberty
FILLAT+ Architecture

L on Liberty is a 71-unit, LEED Gold, affordable housing apartment building located in the north eastern corner of Downtown Baltimore’s West Side Commercial District. The district was once a thriving commercial center which has been in decline for more than a generation.

Located at the corner of North Liberty Street and Clay Street, the structure occupies the entire city block terminating at Park Avenue along its western edge. The existing site was a dilapidated surface parking lot with remnants of the former buildings left as ruins along the southern edge. The building’s form is derived from a combination of a modernist superblock prototype and the traditional Baltimore townhouse fabric. The multifamily building’s ground level units have individual unit entrances creating a neighborhood feel to the redevelopment. A pedestrian right of way was created linking a series of smaller courtyards, thus separating the new building from the existing buildings along the southern edge and preserving the ruins.

The entry lobby is designed as an open inviting space encouraging community gatherings and work study. The building also has a roof terrace overlooking the city skyline while being surrounded by a living roof. The building contains 1BR, 2BR and 3BR units with no onsite vehicular parking. L on Liberty is located along the City’s main north/south bike trail and provides for 25 bicycle parking racks indoors. The project is designed to incorporate sustainable design principles and will be certified LEED Gold.

Owner: N/A | Architectural Design Team: FILLAT+ Architecture | Peter Fillat- President and Lead Architect, Kevin Roycroft- Principal and Lead Architect, Sergio Martinez- Principal and Lead Architect, Austen Hesler- Associate Architect | General Contractor: Hamel Builders, Inc. | Landscape Architect: FILLAT+ Architecture
Civil Engineer: Structural: Century Engineering | Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Century Engineering
Photography: Sam Oberter Photography

2021 AIA Baltimore Residential Design Award

Brighton House
Kevin Vandeman, AIA, Gary James Inglis, RIBA, RIAS

The house is a private residence for a family of five and two grandparents, located on a five-acre site in a rural setting near Brighton Dam on the Triadelphia Reservoir in Maryland. To preserve the natural beauty of the site and respond to the sensitive ecosystem of the surrounding area, the owners and architects created a set of sustainability benchmarks and design goals to guide them during the development of the project, with the intent that the design solution would dissolve the interior and exterior spaces into their natural surroundings. Programmatic elements include three bedrooms, two office spaces designed for adaptation into bedrooms, five baths, a prep kitchen and main kitchen, a family recreation area, a separate autonomous in-law suite, and a living room large enough to accommodate frequent multi-generational family gatherings.

The design solution organized the program around two large exterior living spaces: a landscape terrace on the south that brings daylight, fresh air, passive heating, and quality views to nature from all occupied rooms on the lower level, and a north terrace that connects the living spaces on the upper level and frames views out to the meadow.

Passive design strategies precede the use of high-performance technology, including optimized solar orientation and window to wall ratios, and operable triple-glazed windows for natural ventilation. The minimal composition of the house exterior veils the complexity of the building tectonics and systems within, including a structural insulated

panel exterior achieving R-35 at the walls and R-45 at the roofs. An airtight and smart vapor- variable membrane wraps both the interior and exterior of the structural envelope. Efficient systems in the house include a ground source geothermal heat pump tied to the HVAC system and radiant floors, a ventilation system with heat recovery, hybrid-electric water heaters with heat pumps, LED lighting, and a 22kW 60-panel solar array with battery backup all monitored and controlled by a smart home system.

Sustainable design strategies focused on improving the occupants’ health and wellbeing and reducing the impact on the site and ecosystem. Natural light fills the high ceilings in all occupied rooms, with almost no electric lighting necessary during daylight hours. All water is sourced and treated within the 100% permeable site, with no potable water being used for irrigation. Solar energy collected within the footprint of the building provides enough clean

renewable energy to meet the annual needs of the house and charge the family’s electric vehicle. When excluding the electric vehicle from the calculation, the house alone is a net-positive energy building. However, the decision was made with the client early in the design process to include the electric vehicle in the energy model due to the site not being connected to a walkable community. The house was verified to be net- zero energy after one year of post-occupancy data.

Owner: Deric and Keri Tomenko | Architectural Design Team: Kevin Vandeman, AIA, Gary James Inglis, RIBA, RIAS | Design Architect: Previous Schematic Design with: Blu Homes | General Contractor: Timothy J. Burton | Landscape Architect: Kevin Vandeman, AIA , Gary James Inglis, RIBA, RIAS | Civil Engineer: Benchmark Engineering, Inc | Structural Engineering: Robert Wixson, PE | Mechanical Engineer: Borchers Mechanical Services, Inc.| Electrical Engineer: Builders Electric Service Inc | Photography: Kevin Vandeman, AIA

 

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Honorable Mention (Residential)

Rocky Knob Sauna
GriD architects

On a remote mountain farm in West Virginia a series of rudimentary saunas had been constructed since the late 1970’s. Each iteration advanced the relative permanence of the structure. Unfortunately, the last iteration burned down a quarter century after the first. For another 15 years, the site – at the edge of a spring fed pond – lay dormant, setting the stage for another generation to reimagine the sauna.

This time around, the project emerged as a research driven design/build. Blending students, professionals and craftsman throughout the process, this sauna became an experimental undertaking where participants learned by doing. As part of the design process the team researched sauna traditions throughout the world. This research directly impacted the design of the sauna which abstractly references those traditions while simultaneously reflecting vernacular farm outbuildings from the region. These references are evident in the structures form, craft and materiality.

Leading up to, and during, the team’s 10-day sojourn to construct the sauna a primary challenge was remoteness. The logistical complexities included getting materials, tools and supplies to the property as well as accessing the site which sits along a narrow ridge just at the edge of the pond. Without access to heavy machinery all aspects of the work were completed manually or with small transportable power tools. While intentionally small (65 SF), hand

crafted and reflecting the local vernacular, major components of the design required a high level of technical expertise and construction capability, much of which was learned by the team while on- site or strategically supplemented by local craftsmen.

Owner: N/A | Architectural Design Team: GriD architects | Brian Grieb, Alick Dearie, Ed Leedy, Juan Manjarres, Kristen Hoover, Zahra Williams, Adam Read | General Contractor: GriD architects | Landscape Architect: GriD architects | Civil and Structural Engineer: GriD architects | Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: GriD architects
Photography: Brycen Fischer

FAR Student Award Winners

1st Place: Graduate Design Award
Fadi Alajati, University of Maryland

Graduate Honorable Mention
Adeola Okubadejo, University of Maryland

1st Place: Undergraduate Design Award
Asma Sofan, University of Maryland

2021 Excellence in Design Awards FAR Jury 
Lonna Babu, AIA
Eric Bos, Associate AIA
Emily Lodato, AIA
Matthew Hawkins

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Jury (Residential Architecture)

Cathy Purple Cherry, AIA, LEED AP
Lindsey May, AIA
Dave Smith

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Jury

Russel Baltimore, AIA
Christian Unverzagt, Assoc. AIA
James Witherspoon, AIA
Katy Rupp, Assoc. AIA
Alivia Stalnaker, AIA

2021 Excellence in Design Awards Good Design=Good Business Jury

Pavlina Illieva, AIA
Al Barry
Anthony Consoli, AIA

2021 Social Equity Design Award JuryBrandon Schultz, AIA
Heidi Thomas, PLA, ASLA
Daniel McCarthy